Artists

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Teenager
Teenager hailed from Auburn, New York, the city of tattoo parlors and drug stores. The five-member band performed original rock music with tinges of punk, psychedelic and alt-country. In December 2007, they released their critically acclaimed studio recording debut Entitled. On the heels of their critical success they played a handful of shows in Central New York. Before breaking up in April 2009, they released their “swan song” album All Kids Free.


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John Reilly
John Reilly was a gentleman. He was humble, gregarious, and always a pleasure to be around. Above all John was a remarkable songwriter and musician. Music was the guiding force of John’s life, from the first time he picked up the guitar in 1963 to his last recording session ten days before he passed away in June 2009. His devotion to music serves as an example to the scores of musicians of who knew him.

 

Rob Lee

Rob Lee
Rob Lee, formerly of M-150 and Omega, has recorded two solo albums heavily inspired by Joseph Campbell, Charles Bukowski,and the Coen brothers. His latest release “Eudaimonia” takes a step away from the mellow introversion of Rob Lee’s previous self titled EP and turns outward to face the world.

 

A Cast of Thousands

A Cast of Thousands
A Cast of Thousands is a trio from Auburn, New York. Comprised of a librarian, a vocational teacher, and a maintenance worker A Cast of Thousands is an unapologetic local band. They are loyal to their geographic, social, and political realities and create collagist portraits and landscapes that elevate everyday life. An associate of the band says, “they have contemporaries, but not around here.” Their songs have been described as “barnstormers”, “simple stabs at precious pop”, with a “rough and ready sonic immediacy.” They’ve recorded three albums – A Cast of Thousands, Aqua Fur, and most recently Alone in the Crowd. Jack Rabid from The Big Takeover described their latest release “as organic and free of fatteners as a Portlandia free-range chicken, ‘Alone’ is good and plenty.”